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Zayda is a Baha'i living and serving in Australia's capital, Canberra.

I Love the Baha’i Faith, I Just Don’t Like Statistics

(Photo: Baha'i World Centre)

There has always been a special relationship between the Faith and numbers. Nine pointed star. Ninety-five Allah’u’Abhas. Nineteen Letters of the Living and subsequently nineteen terraces.

Despite this, I’ve noticed that many of us still seem to internally resist when it comes to using numbers to advance the Cause. Whether it’s setting numerical teaching goals in a cluster, being remunerated for full-time service, or calculating how many home visits were made in a cycle – putting a number next to a spiritual undertaking can feel counter-intuitive for many, or even wrong. But is it? Continue reading

4 Reasons Accompaniment is So Important

Participants of a Study Circle in Battambang, Cambodia (Photo: Baha'i World Centre)

The word “accompaniment” has become a quintessential part of Baha’i “jargon”. As the Universal House of Justice wrote in their 2010 Ridvan Message, “the growing frequency with which the word ‘accompany’ appears in conversations among the friends” is in fact a sign of the evolution of a collective consciousness emerging among the Friends. Accompaniment is, as the House writes, “a word that is being endowed with new meaning as it is integrated into the common vocabulary of the Baha’i community” and signifies no less than the strengthening of a culture that fosters the participation of more and more people in a united effort to apply Baha’u’llah’s teachings to the construction of a divine civilization.

Accompaniment, like everything in the Baha’i Faith, is a concept that needs to be translated into action if it is to have any effect in achieving the vision described by Baha’u’llah and laid out by the Universal House of Justice.

What then can accompaniment look like as we advance from merely talking about it to carrying it out? Continue reading

The Importance of Memorizing the Baha’i Writings

Memory is one of the five spiritual powers that we, as humans, possess. In addition to the five physical senses, we also have imagination, thought, comprehension, memory, and what Abdu’l-Baha terms the “common faculty”.

While our physical senses enable us to navigate through the material world, it is our spiritual powers that allow us to transcend it. Memory is therefore something unique to us and non-occurring in the natural world. As Abdu’l-Baha says, “man is fortified with memory” – it is an attribute and a strength with which we have been endowed.

When we look through the sequence of Ruhi courses, it is evident that the memorization of quotes and prayers plays a key role in our study. Tutors and participants alike sometimes struggle with the expectation to commit long passages of text to memory, particularly when unaccustomed to the style of language often used. It might even seem unnecessary to memorize in a world where smartphones allow us easy and instantaneous access to prayers and Writings from wherever we are.

Our willingness to memorize is key to being able to do so. The importance of memorization should therefore not be lost on us: Continue reading

7 Ways to Help You Memorize the Baha’i Writings

Abdu’l-Baha listed memory as one of the five spiritual powers that we possess, and as Baha’is we are encouraged to memorize the Baha’i Writings. We know that using God’s word in its purest form is what really touches the souls, and it’s also a good way to ensure that the Word of God is with us at all times.

For many of us however, memorizing the Writings can be a struggle, and the different methods of memorization work differently for different people, so I’ve listed seven ways which may help you memorize the Baha’i Writings: Continue reading

Why Cluster Reflection Meetings Are So Important

A Cluster Reflection Meeting in Greater London, United Kingdom. (Photo: Baha'i World Centre)

A Cluster Reflection Meeting in Greater London, United Kingdom. (Photo: Baha’i World Centre)

Cluster Reflection meetings are an important part of Baha’i community life now, but depending on the community you live in, attendance can sometimes be low and it’s still something many communities are learning about, so I thought it would be interesting to look at the importance of these meetings and why we should make an effort to attend. Continue reading

6 Ways You Can Support the Junior Youth Program – Even if You’re Not an Animator

Junior Youth in Banting Malaysia. (Photo: Baha'i World Centre)

Junior Youth in Banting Malaysia. (Photo: Baha’i World Centre)

Most Baha’is, both young and old, can accept that the future of our community and the driving force behind its growth will be the Junior Youth Spiritual Empowerment Program – or JYSEP.

What fewer Baha’is can reconcile with is their role within this movement. There are children who become junior youth, and junior youth who become participants, and “older” youth who become the animators that accompany them.

And then there’s the rest of us.

If you’re a youth in spirit though not in reality, you may feel you are on the periphery of a phenomenon. As we are encouraged more and more to support the youth, to support this Program, it is easy to ask, “But, how?” if you are neither a youth nor part of this Program.

It is, of course, never too late to become an animator of a junior youth group, particularly if you are in a cluster, community or neighbourhood, in which the need outweighs the available resources.

If, for whatever reason, serving as an animator is not feasible for you, there are still a number of ways you are able to contribute to the JYSEP. Continue reading