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Layli Miron

Layli and her husband Sergey moved to central Pennsylvania so she could pursue her dream of earning a PhD in rhetoric and composition. In the moments when she’s not writing or grading papers, she most enjoys spending time with Sergey. They collaborate on projects of a local nature, to serve the region’s Baha’i community, and of a global scope, expanding their knowledge through watching documentaries and traveling.

Feeling Boundless Love for Others

Photo: courtesy of the Baha'i International Community

Shed the light of a boundless love on every human being whom you meet, whether of your country, your race, your political party, or of any other nation, color or shade of political opinion.

– Abdu’l-Baha

The security of people of Middle Eastern and South Asian descent living in the United States seems to be on thin ice: bearing brown skin and a “foreign” name are dangerous liabilities. Evidence comes in recent hate crimes like February’s Kansas killing. Engineers Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani were attacked by a man who told them to “get out of my country.” Kuchibhotla died. The attacker later disclosed that he thought his victims, who were natives of India, were Iranian. In March, Hasel Afshar returned to his Oregon town from vacation to discover his home ransacked and hateful messages coating the walls of his house. The messages indicated that the attackers believed Afshar to be Muslim. He is actually a Baha’i refugee from Iran. Persecuted for his faith in his homeland—attacked for his foreignness in his refuge.  Continue reading